Types of nail fungus and how to treat



Fungal nail infections can be caused by three different types of fungus, alone or in combination.
  • Dermatophytes are a type of fungus that can grow on the skin, hair, and nails. The most common dermatophyte, Trichophyton rubrum, causes most cases of athlete's foot. Athlete's foot, in turn, can infect the toenails. You can get infected by contact with objects that have dermatophytes on them, such as clothing, shoes, nail clippers, nail files, shower and locker room floors, and carpet
  • Yeasts are a type of fungus that grows on the skin and nails. They are normally present on the human body. Things like illness, antibiotic or birth control pill use, and immune system problems may allow an overgrowth of yeast, leading to a yeast infection.
You can get a fungal nail infection when you come in contact with the fungus and it begins to grow on or under your nail. Fungi grows best in warm, moist areas, such as the area around the toes. But you can have fungi on your skin without getting a nail infection. If you are susceptible to fungal infections, they tend to return, even after successful treatment and especially if you don't take preventive steps.
A fungal nail infection usually isn't painful. But without treatment, over time it can become uncomfortable or even painful to wear shoes, walk, or stand for a long time.
Your symptoms will depend on the type of infection you have. The two most common infections are both caused by dermatophytes.
Distal subungual onychomycosis Symptoms include:
  • Yellow streaks in the nail bed and on the underside of the nail.
  • Buildup of bits and pieces of skin and nail fragments (debris) under the nail.
  • A discolored and thickened nail that may separate from the skin under the nail.
  • A brittle, broken, and thickened nail.
White superficial onychomycosis is a fungal infection of the nail surface. Symptoms include:
  • White spots or streaks on the nail surface.
  • Soft and powdery nail surface, as the infection gets worse.
  • Damaged, crumbly, and brown or gray nail surface. But the nail doesn't separate from the skin underneath.
Not all nail infections are fungal infections. Conditions with similar symptoms include eczema, psoriasis, and Reiter's syndrome.

Find more information:  http://www.webmd.com/skin-problems-and-treatments/nail-problems

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